Home Renovation and Window Replacement: A Quick Step-by-Step Guide

Denver Window Replacement

These days, home renovation is more popular than ever. We spend a lot of time in our houses, so why shouldn’t we make them as beautiful, comfortable, and efficient as possible?

For all the attention paid to the glamorous parts of the home renovation process – like putting in new floors, or painting the walls – Denver window replacement tends to be overlooked. Even on popular home renovation television shows, new windows seem to just “appear,” without too much thought being given to which window should be used or where they’re going to come from.

With that in mind, we’d like to give you a quick, step-by-step guide to choosing the right replacement windows as part of your home renovation project:

  • Match styles to design patterns. Occasionally, homeowners will fall in love with a particular type of window, forgetting that it might not match the overall style or decor of a room. Look at the big picture when matching windows to design patterns.
  • Measure everything twice. It goes without saying that getting the sizes wrong when it comes to your Denver window replacement project can lead to delays, headaches, and additional expenses. At New Windows for America, we make sure your measurements are exact and accurate.
  • Think colors, lines, and aesthetics. Some styles of windows look even better (or conversely, not as impressive) when put next to certain colors or items of furniture. When in doubt, talk with your New Windows for America design consultant who can make sure your different pieces will work well together.
  • Don’t feel confined by an existing window style. A lot of homeowners feel like it’s simplest to just replace existing windows with a newer set of the same style. While that’s sometimes true, you can often dramatically change the look of a room just by experimenting with different window replacement options.
  • Look ahead to maintenance. Some lower-cost windows are less durable and harder to clean. Try to choose the windows you’ll want to have in your home later, not just the ones that are easiest to buy right now.
  • Make efficiency a priority. In the same way, a good set of windows can pay for itself pretty quickly with lower energy bills. That’s particularly true for those of us living around the Rockies, so make sure your new windows will be energy-efficient.
  • Get expert help. When you aren’t sure what kinds of windows you want or need, don’t forget that New Windows for America is an expert in replacement windows,and we provide free estimates.

With these steps in place, you’ll know the basics of Denver window replacement and how it fits into your overall home renovation project. For more advice, or to see the different styles and how they could work in the space you’re trying to create, contact us today by calling us at (303) 920-0175, email us for a free estimate, or visit our showroom. A member of our New Windows for America team will be happy to walk you through your different choices for design, efficiency, and installation.

Window Safety Tips

Pella Windows Home Safety

Nearly 5,000 children in the United States are treated in hospital emergency departments annually for injuries sustained from falling out windows, according to the Safe Kids Worldwide® campaign. Many of those falls occur during spring and summer months as families open windows to let fresh air in but fail to take adequate safety precautions which can lead to accidental falls.

To help raise safety awareness, Pella Corporation has partnered with the National Safety Council, through its Window Safety Task Force, and others in the window and door industry to communicate to consumers about the importance of proper installation, function and use of windows in a home or building.

Pella offers these important tips to help enhance home safety:

  • Remember there is no safety substitute for responsible adult supervision around children. Set and enforce rules about keeping children’s play away from windows, doors and balconies to help prevent an accidental fall or injury.
  • For greatest safety, keep your windows closed and locked when children are around. When opening windows for ventilation, open those that a child cannot reach. For example, on double-hung windows which feature two moveable sashes, open the top portion for ventilation and keep the bottom part closed for greater safety.
  • Keep furniture such as beds and dressers — or anything children can climb — away from windows to help improve safety in your home. Don’t allow children to jump on beds or sofas, which could lead to accidental falls or injury. Furniture placed under a window can create an enticement to climb and the potential to fall, especially for young children. Furniture placed under a window could also slow your escape from a home in the event of an emergency, such as a fire.
  • Windows provide a secondary means of escape from a burning home. For greater safety, determine your family’s emergency escape plan and practice it regularly.
  • Designate a door as the primary exit and a window as an alternate escape route from each room in your home. Make sure each opens quickly and easily and keep the escape route free from clutter, which could present a tripping or falling hazard, especially in dark or smoky conditions. Remember that children may have to rely on a window to escape in a fire. Help them learn to safely use a window under these circumstances.
  • When performing seasonal repairs or cleaning, make sure your windows and doors are not jammed, painted or nailed shut. You must be able to open them quickly to escape in an emergency. If they don’t, it’s time to consider replacement, because windows and doors can be replaced; lives can’t.
  • Windows, which tilt in for cleaning, not only provide greater convenience, but greater potential safety, too. When choosing windows, look for those which can be cleaned from the interior simply by tilting the unit inward, eliminating the need to climb an exterior ladder for window cleaning.
  • If you have young children in your home and are considering adding window guards or window fall prevention devices, properly install approved guards that meet American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, and feature a quick-release mechanism, so they can be opened for escape in an emergency. Consult your local building code official for more information on approved fall prevention devices and proper placement.
  • If you live in an area subject to hurricanes, consider impact-resistant glass for windows and patio doors to help provide year-round protection from winds, rain and flying debris. Impact-resistant glass, which cannot be easily penetrated helps protect your home year-round, providing a safe solution.
  • If your home features impact-resistant windows or patio doors designed to withstand hurricane-force winds, train your family members to first attempt to open the window to exit through it in an emergency, rather than trying to break the glass. Impact-resistant glass cannot be easily penetrated, so it’s important to acquaint everyone in your household with how to open units, or designate other exits if the unit is fixed in place and does not open.
  • For added protection, choose blinds and shades with no room-side cords; window treatments with traditional cords can contribute to childhood injuries. One option is Pella’s Designer Series® collection of windows and patio doors, which feature blinds or shades protected between panes of glass. The cordless operation of the collection and protection of window treatments between glass helps keep children and pets safer in the home. Designer Series windows and doors are also beneficial for those with allergies and asthma; units featuring blinds protected between panes of glass can significantly reduce indoor airborne allergens. Recent research found that windows with traditional room-side blinds collected 200 times more of certain indoor airborne allergens than the Designer Series products.*

Additional window safety tips are available year-round at: www.nsc.org.

For more information on quality windows, please click here, or contact your window specialist at New Windows for America at 303.920.0175.

*Based on data from research conducted by the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health at The University of Iowa.

Top 10 Spring Things to Check

Spring Cleaning

Spring has sprung! The days are longer and the air is warmer. Time to put away the winter coats and break out the toolbox. Winter storms and temperatures can wreak havoc on a home and finding out where repairs may be necessary is vital. Some are cheap; others…not so much. In any case, it needs to be done. So get up off your duff, grab a pen and paper, and get ready to look at these Top 10 Spring Things to Check!

  1. Spring Cleaning. Your house has been shut up all winter; hermetically sealed against the cold winter storms. Now that spring is here, it’s time to open the windows and start dusting! Make a list of what need to go into storage and which rooms are in most dire need of cleaning.
  2. Change the Filter. This is a bi-annual job best done during the spring and fall. Clogged air filters in the furnace often cause the unit to work harder which means a higher energy bill.
  3. Air out the Attic. Leaks or condensation buildup in the attic are a great place for mold and mildew to start. By opening attic vents and letting a fan blow through, you dry out the stale, possible humid air and make it harder for spores to grow. This is also a fantastic time to look for those leaks and get them repaired.
  4. Test the top. While we’re on the subject on the roof, safely climb up and check for broken, worn, or buckled shingles. The summer heat will exacerbate any damage that’s already been done during the winter and increase the chances of a leak. While you’re up there, check the chimney as well.
  5. Gauge the Gutters. This one gets a whole section of its own since this can be a huge job. Yearly cleaning of the gutters will keep old detritus from compacting and composting; weighing down the bracers and creating sagging areas. It’s also another place to figure out how much graveling your shingles have lost.
  6. Scope the Sides. Since you started at the top, work your way down. Look for cracks and leaks around window frames and doorways. Are there breaks or damage to the siding? Maybe this is the year to slap a fresh coat of paint on.
  7. Brace the Bottom. The melting snow has a tendency to wash earth away from the foundation so you may need to replace it with new compacted soil to prevent basement leaks. Look at outdoor faucets as well for breaks or leaks in the wall around them.
  8. Look at the Lawn. Wander around your yard and find low spots where water may collect. It may be great for the grass in that area, but it also means that water is flowing away from other spots that won’t look as healthy later on in the season. De-winterize your lawn tools now as well. Change out old gas and clean the contacts so that you aren’t fighting to start the mower when the time does come to trim the grass.
  9. Check the Cooler. Whether you have forced air A/C or and evaporative cooler, this is the time to get them cleaned and cleared. Check the A/C condenser for any twigs or other fan blade damaging debris that might cause costly repairs. Open up the swamp cooler and clean the media to prevent that nasty musty smell the first few times you run it.
  10. Deck out the Deck. Let’s face it, with longer days, you’re going to be out here more and it needs to be nice. Look for damaged or warped boards that need to be replaced. Break out and hose off the patio furniture that has been buried at the back of the garage since late fall. Take the cover off of the grill and give the slats a scrape to clear off the dust that has collected.

Prepping for spring and summer isn’t really hard to do. It can be time consuming and may claim a few weekends. While inspecting your house, take a look at your windows, siding and doors. Do they need spring cleaning, or maybe even replacement? Contact New Windows for America for a FREE estimate! When you have completed this checklist, you will know that you can sit back, relax, and enjoy the summer.

When Should I Replace My Windows and Doors?

New Windows for America | Replace Windows and Doors

Springtime has come around again and it’s time to start looking at exterior home repairs. Windows, doors, and siding can be expensive and time consuming replacements and knowing when they are necessary is crucial. Can it be put off for another year, or is it time to start looking at budgeting now. How to tell? To make that decision easier, here are 3 signs that it’s time to replace windows, doors, or siding.

  1. Leaks. This is the most obvious sign that replacement is necessary. A gap between the doorway and frame that lets light in is also letting that expensively heated air out. As a house settles, frames shift and lose their original shape; warping the door or window as well. This causes leaks that may be fixed temporarily with foam sealers or stick on weather stripping, but in the long run, will require replacing the frame and window alike.
    • How to tell: The easiest indicator is the feel of a draft. Moving a lit candle around the edge of the window or door and looking for abnormal flame motion will indicate air movement in and out of the casement. In the case of leaking siding, cold areas may form inside a room with an outside wall. These spots will occur close to the wall itself and might even be felt by hand.
  2. Difficulty Operating. Another indication of warping frames can be detected when windows or doors are difficult to open or shut. When they were installed, they moved smoothly and without trouble. Expansion of the wood in the frames or the frames moving “out-of-square” will keep the window or door from sliding easily on its rails or hinges. This will eventually lead to more sticking and loss of function.
    • How to tell: In sliding windows and doors, applying a small amount of lubricating jelly in the runner will help a window that is simply running paint-on-paint or is low on lubricating grease that was part of installation. Difficulty in movement after sliding open and shut around 10-20 times indicates a disfigured frame and replacement is necessary.
      In swinging windows and doors, friction areas in the frame will be visible where the frame is pinching. A small section that does not hinder opening or closing is ok, but indicative of future problems. Replacement is necessary when major effort is required to operate the window or door.
  3. Aesthetics. In a house that has historic value, replacement may not be an option. In younger homes, however, perfectly usable, yet outdated, windows, doors, or siding may need to be updated to increase resale value or to coordinate with a new theme design. Another visual indicator might be chipped paint, cracked panes, or water stains. These are signs of neglect and disuse that make a negative statement about the homeowner.
    • How to tell: Signs of neglect are often obvious, glaring, and can be detected on a daily basis. In the case of design or outdated style, a consultant may be required to make the final call.

It is important to keep windows, doors, and siding updated and in good condition for many reasons. Leaks cost money, framing disfigurement causes frustration, and poor maintenance announces neglect; all problems that no homeowner wants. Proper repair or replacement, however, will improve the home and life all around.

Contact us for an In-Home estimate or call us at 303-920-0175 today!